Bird Watching

This page is to share random quotes (tweets) and any thoughts from observing any feminist birds, traditionalist birds or angry birds. Comments flow from newest at the top to the oldest. A bit awkward to read that way but save tons of page scrolls to the most recent discussions.

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2,141 thoughts on “Bird Watching

  1. TPC said:

    “For the non-academic professional-earning class, that hasn’t been the case for a couple of decades. They can be lured into cheaper areas, but they don’t then remain cheap, and they lack the easily accessible amenities. Atlanta is a good example. You can’t make 150k as a household and have all the list of stuff you’re talking about. And you definitely can’t on sub-100k as a household. And it’s not a small town, it has a lot of Big City Things, but you can’t live 5-10 minutes from all of them because the town itself isn’t arranged for that. Even Chicago isn’t like that, and it is a legit large city with many amenities “stacked” pretty conveniently to each other.”

    I’m certainly not talking about Atlanta or Chicago size cities. I don’t know if it’s true, but even in San Antonio (pop. 1.5 million) the joke is that any two points in San Antonio are 20 minutes apart. In Dallas/Fort Worth, on the other hand, any two points are generally an hour apart (at least it always winds up working out that way whenever we plan a trip there). Meanwhile, when we lived in DC, a friend who lived on Capitol Hill but had a kid in school in Georgetown needed an hour to get between the two (it’s really close as the crow flies), and at some point when we lived in the MD suburbs, we realized that our VA friends were a two hour drive away and we couldn’t in decency invite anybody from VA or DC to visit, even though we all (technically!) lived in the same metro area. Everything gets snarled in a really high population area.

    When I listed off our amenities, our current town is nice (especially for parents of small children), but that’s virtually ALL there is (aside from the college, which is a world in itself). So you don’t have real big city amenities, but you also don’t have to drive an hour to get anywhere. It’s very compact (for car dependent values of “compact”), but what you get is what you get.

    “Anyway, by turning to women and accepting that the work will take 2-3x as long, we have been able to resolve those trades work difficulties I was stressing about.”

    Yay! Farm repairs or house repairs?

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  2. “There tends to be a relationship between cost of living and size of community, but it is possible to hit a sweet spot with regard to moderate cost of living, convenient access to local resources, and there being adequate local resources.

    I really do think that conditions are very specific to different locales. I’m not saying la-la-la move to Brigadoon like me! But I am saying that it is possible to streamline one’s life well below $400k–in the right place.”

    I kinda have to believe my lying eyes and those of people I know who don’t live in my area on this one. For the non-academic professional-earning class, that hasn’t been the case for a couple of decades. They can be lured into cheaper areas, but they don’t then remain cheap, and they lack the easily accessible amenities. Atlanta is a good example. You can’t make 150k as a household and have all the list of stuff you’re talking about. And you definitely can’t on sub-100k as a household. And it’s not a small town, it has a lot of Big City Things, but you can’t live 5-10 minutes from all of them because the town itself isn’t arranged for that. Even Chicago isn’t like that, and it is a legit large city with many amenities “stacked” pretty conveniently to each other.

    Twenty years ago, before the internet, things were different. People had a different idea of what constituted amenities and people also had a certain amount of required socialization to get basic life things done.

    Anyway, by turning to women and accepting that the work will take 2-3x as long, we have been able to resolve those trades work difficulties I was stressing about.

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  3. Going back to TPC’s talk about the difficulties of getting good help, I think the following help a lot:

    –not being in a high cost-of-living area
    –having a high enough population density that there are multiple options in a small area (you don’t wind up at the mercy of the one guy who does XYZ who is willing to drive to your community)
    –it being a small enough community that people know that they will have to deal with you again, so they’d better not screw up/it being small enough that businesses have community-wide reputations

    We live in an area with all three of those features, but now that I look at that list, it’s somewhat contradictory or at least a bit of a Goldilocks situation (not too small but not too big).

    Just being in a low cost-of-living area is not enough, because the person you need is often a 90+ minute drive away, so lots of luck.

    I was realizing after I posted earlier that we have encountered bad tradesmen here (a friend’s cheap, shady ex-con contractor) or the moonlighting repair people at our last rental who left us with intermittent heating between Thanksgiving and Christmas with a newborn baby in the house. With regard to the repair people, it was like night and day when the management company finally sent out a real (and no doubt much more expensive) HVAC guy. In general, better people seem to cost more. But our local tradespeople are much better (on average) than what I’ve heard either about big city Pacific NW tradespeople or rural PNW tradespeople. My family in PNW DIYs practically everything they can and now that I’ve been thinking about this, I realize it’s because they have to. There is nobody close by who is reliable for a lot of stuff.

    Another reason I don’t identify with the idea that only $400k and up lifestyle is non-chaotic is that we’ve gotten a lot of mileage out of scrupulously managing where we live. There are families at school who have a 45-60-minute one-way commute. I don’t know how they do it. We are:

    –5 minutes to children’s museum
    –about a 10 minute walking commute to husband’s work
    –10 minutes to zoo
    –around 10 minute drive to school (it’s mysteriously about 5 minutes from school to home)
    –under 10 minutes to grocery
    –10-20 minutes to church (depending where we go)
    –15-20 minutes from most other things in town (doctor, hospital, library, dentist, bookstore, mechanic, sporting goods store, etc.)
    –35-40 minutes to my most distant routine destination (once a week at most)

    So, although getting kids from point A to point B is a big part of my life, I don’t spend a lot of time in transit, at least not compared to parents in larger metropolitan areas. It’s a big deal if we get in the car and drive an hour one way.

    There tends to be a relationship between cost of living and size of community, but it is possible to hit a sweet spot with regard to moderate cost of living, convenient access to local resources, and there being adequate local resources.

    I really do think that conditions are very specific to different locales. I’m not saying la-la-la move to Brigadoon like me! But I am saying that it is possible to streamline one’s life well below $400k–in the right place.

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  4. Two-Cent Woman said,

    “Agreed. I have seen them too. One fairly recently just earlier this year, I believe.”

    Yeah, there’s also a newlywed husband who is in the process of tanking his marriage for basically no reason at all.

    Like

  5. “I have seen a handful of commenters actually say that going red-pill cost them their marriage. To say that was a good thing (losing the marriage, but going red-pill was worth it) would be an instance of the male rationalization hamster.”

    Agreed. I have seen them too. One fairly recently just earlier this year, I believe.

    Like

  6. Two-Cent Woman-
    I know what you mean re: men with marriage problems. I have seen a handful of commenters actually say that going red-pill cost them their marriage. To say that was a good thing (losing the marriage, but going red-pill was worth it) would be an instance of the male rationalization hamster.

    Like

  7. ys “I think there is some valuable content on some manosphere blogs, but it isn’t a good place for those on the spectrum.”

    I don’t think its a good place for divorced men or those with marriage problems. The “valuable content” can probably be found elsewhere without the poison. Those who are angry and bitter, whether justified or not, aren’t really in a good headspace to sift the wheat from the chaff. Some sit and comment for 10+ plus years but show no fruit in their personal lives to get much benefit. I’m sure there are many more men who have stumbled on it, stayed for awhile and moved on realizing the manosphere was messing with their head and their outlook on life. You just don’t see them because they aren’t part of the core commenters on most of the sites.

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  8. Exactly. It’s hard to take seriously their message both because of the way they are going about it and the message their “look” sends. I’m not so sure they are the “mascots” the MRA’s had in mind. The comments from both men and women seemed to be confusion and quite underwhelmed with the idea.

    I liked this comment on the article

    “Jonathin Dick, Poughkeepsie, United States, 14 hours ago

    In the face of Weinstein and #metoo their timing might be off

    Like

  9. As a manosphere lurker and occasional commenter, this discussion of Asperger’s is interesting. Yeah, some guys in the ‘sphere might be Aspergers. Others just “sperg out” as it were. I think there is some valuable content on some manosphere blogs, but it isn’t a good place for those on the spectrum.

    Like

  10. Stone,

    Yeah.

    Is this

    a) lack of understanding of likely manosphere reaction to women with chub and tattoos?

    or

    b) epic trolling?

    Like

  11. AmyP “I think people like Bill Cosby and Harvey Weinstein are largely motivated by power.

    They could have easily had what they wanted from other women without assault, which suggests it wasn’t entirely about sex.”

    Exactly. It’s also stems from a huge sense of entitlement because of their status and power over the career hopes of many young actresses dreaming of making it big-or at least to keep working to pay the bills.

    Like

  12. I think people like Bill Cosby and Harvey Weinstein are largely motivated by power.

    They could have easily had what they wanted from other women without assault, which suggests it wasn’t entirely about sex.

    Like

  13. Here’s an interesting article. It’s from 2016 so maybe someone has seen it but it’s the first time I ran across it.

    Rape…is it about power or sex? This sociologist claims it’s about sex.

    Personally, I think it’s a combination of the two.

    From the article –

    “If rapists are primarily motivated by the desire for power and domination, then one would expect them to prefer middle-aged, career women. However, if rapists primarily desire sex, then one would expect them to prefer young women and men. Our research demonstrates that offenders almost always attack the young (see the figure below). The percentage of female victims who are over 50 is close to zero. Similarly, in male prisons, where women are extremely scarce, heterosexual men target the youngest inmates.”

    “Most recent discussions about sexual assault have focused on college students. However, it is high school kids that are at the greatest risk of being sexually assaulted. Our analyses of FBI data reveal that 15-year-olds are at the highest risk of sexual assault. They are about 9 times more likely to be raped than 35-year-olds. Women rarely engage in sexual assault – they make up 3% of the offenders – but when they do commit sexual assaults, they most often target 15-year-olds. A power motive can’t explain why both male and female offenders prefer young victims. Only a sexual motive can do the job.”

    My beef with this theory is this -Is it the youth’s attraction that causes them to be at highest risk of rape or their vulnerability?

    ttp://quillette.com/2016/01/02/to-rape-is-to-want-sex-not-power/

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  14. Yeah. I was pretty excited when I saw it was offered to all seniors. They kind of get to see how a lot of what they’ve been learning in books all these years is applied real life. (and a lot of stuff not covered in school)

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  15. “My oldest is getting the most “life skills” type of learning from her class called Senior Seminar.

    We need more classes like that!

    Like

  16. I didn’t stay in Girl Scouts past the juniors because we moved and I had also joined 4-H in my last Girl Scout year. 4-H was WAY better, though! I stayed in 4-H until I aged out, and I was involved up past my ears. I did about five project areas and turned in my record book every year; went to Chicago in 1992 to National Congress. Fell short of the five scholarships offered by Kraft Foods to the top winners in the Food and Nutrition program which was a crushing disappointment (I was very driven to get that scholarship) but the 4-H experience was AWESOME. I strongly encourage you to check out 4-H in your area for your kids if it might work for you — kids do have to be nine years old to be official members, but in recent years they’ve introduced a program called Cloverleafs which is for ages 5-8, with a specific curriculum — Cloverleafs cannot do the individual project areas and not all community clubs have a Cloverleafs club along with their project clubs.

    4-H is definitely the best! 🙂 The whole family can participate, and you aren’t dealing with all this gender junk (at least not yet).

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  17. Two-Cent Woman said:

    “My oldest is getting the most “life skills” type of learning from her class called Senior Seminar. She has learned to check fluids in a car, check the air pressure and change a flat tire. She has also changed the propane tank on a gas grill and learned to clean and season the grates. They have many more things like that they will be doing throughout the year. They teach them how to keep a checkbook, stick to a budget, shop for different types of insurance, interview skills and about renting/buying a home. She’s really enjoying that class.”

    Wow! That sounds great.

    Like

  18. Two Cent Woman said:

    “Our troop was pretty lame. They didn’t hike, camp or take trips. Just met in the same meeting hall each week.”

    Yeah. I didn’t do Girl Scouts, but I did do my childhood church’s girls’ program back in the 1980s. I was initially a Daisy, then a Prim, and then finally a Missionette (!). I think my younger sister may have been a Rainbow at one point.

    http://mgc.ag.org/about/history/

    I have nothing bad to say about Daisies or Prims, but we were 6th graders in Missionettes, and what you have mentioned sounds painfully familiar. The uniform (which few girls acquired) was a sky blue polyester number. Even to my uncritical 11-year-old eye, it looked terrible. We did some memory verses (mainly 1 Corinthians 13 in KJV) and one lame craft. It was wrapping yarn around clothes hangers–I kid you not. You were supposed to (in theory) be working toward qualifications, but there wasn’t any serious effort. To my knowledge, the only person who ever got the full qualifications was a developmentally disabled girl. Cooking instruction would have been a HUGE step up.

    I got a lot more out of doing 4-H baking around the same age.

    The church boys’ group (Royal Rangers) always looked like more fun.

    https://royalrangers.com/

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  19. My oldest is getting the most “life skills” type of learning from her class called Senior Seminar. She has learned to check fluids in a car, check the air pressure and change a flat tire. She has also changed the propane tank on a gas grill and learned to clean and season the grates. They have many more things like that they will be doing throughout the year. They teach them how to keep a checkbook, stick to a budget, shop for different types of insurance, interview skills and about renting/buying a home. She’s really enjoying that class.

    Like

  20. Anon, what you describe was more like what I was expecting when my girls signed up. We didn’t get anything like that. Not even homemaking skills. I mean they made biscuits once and baked cupcakes, I think, but that’s not really the skills I was hoping they would learn. I already taught them that stuff at home. Our troop was pretty lame. They didn’t hike, camp or take trips. Just met in the same meeting hall each week. They did work a fish fry once but really that’s about it.

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  21. “My girls’ got bored with it because it seemed they did A LOT of crafts and baking and a few other minor things but nothing that was very interesting to them or that would give them good life skills in many areas.”

    I was a Girl Scout in the eighties, and the tone was different. They were actually — dare I say it? — more feminist, I think, then they are recently. Let me explain. The truth is, they were really focused (at least my troop was) on preparing us for adult life. This was also the case in my mother’s generation. Only in Mom’s troop, they were doing homemaking/childcare oriented things, and we were doing professional/career oriented things (although we could still earn the homemaking badges, and I earned all of them). But the gist here is that we were getting ready to do something bigger, there was always discussion of the future and what you might do. We camped, we hiked, we worked, we did do a number of crafts, we went on one field trip after another, the leaders were so energized I often wonder how they’re doing today — they’re all in their seventies and eighties now. We practically had the book “From Dreams to Reality” memorized! (I don’t know if it’s even still in print.) But you get the point. They were constantly challenging us to stretch our imaginations. I told one of the leaders I wasn’t doing well at math. Her response, “Well, then that’s a good challenge for you. You can choose to give up, or you can choose to accept that challenge. What are you going to do?” It took me a while, but I finally got respectable math grades in college, and it was partly due to that leader telling me, in effect, that I wasn’t defined by my past.

    Hey, that’s a good memory…..something I need to reconsider. There are many areas where I’m letting my past define me; maybe now would be a good time to revisit that challenge. 🙂

    I think now they have dumbed it down partly because they’re probably afraid of some lawsuit and partly because they have caved into the modern culture. In the eighties they weren’t actively promoting the Planned Parenthood agenda; they didn’t start doing that until I was out of it. With only one semester with American Heritage Girls, I really liked the troop and the leader, but we didn’t have time for it. I wish I was more familiar with it, but this isn’t the season of my life to be involved. Maybe when I’m a grandmother I’ll help start up a troop or something. I would like to see AHG become like Girl Scouts used to be — patriotic and never ceasing to challenge girls to reach their full potential in whatever field they choose for themselves. They have a “Respect Life” badge which can be earned through doing pro-life activities.

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  22. “So, it sounds more like a mother-daughter activity?

    And maybe (if it’s just a mother-daughter activity) you’d choose something different?”

    Well, more like a parent-daughter activity anyway. About 1/3 of the parents were dads.

    I felt at the time as a SAHM that we already did a lot of mother/daughter activities. I had the impression that Girl Scouts was about girls learning to be more self-suffcient among other things. How can they do that if their parents are hanging around with them helping them over every little bump?

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  23. Two Cent Woman said:

    “Right. They don’t like those groups because they don’t get into women bashing enough.”

    …and other bad behavior is probably unwelcome at men’s church groups.

    I just can’t imagine guys with a Red Pill vocabulary getting on very well with our local Baptist guys–and they obviously don’t.

    Like

  24. Two-Cent Woman said:

    “Honestly, I couldn’t see what I was needed for to sit around and do string art and I felt that all the girls sitting with their parents were prevented from helping each other and getting to know one another better.”

    So, it sounds more like a mother-daughter activity?

    And maybe (if it’s just a mother-daughter activity) you’d choose something different?

    Like

  25. AmyP “notice that there are a lot of complaints about lack of “male spaces” from guys who don’t actually want to go to men’s church groups.”

    Right. They don’t like those groups because they don’t get into women bashing enough.

    As far as male spaces for men, the only ones I’m aware of like the K of C are full of old retired guys. They are the only ones who have the time to meet the requirements. My husband works in an engineering office that is mostly men which gives him male company but I look think there is a little bit of a lack in male recreation available apart from work. I think he would benefit from having a group of guys to go fishing with or similar activities. The poor guy lives in an all female household (wife, three daughters-two who are teens-and even two female cats). None of us girls are outdoorsy/sporty types so there isn’t even that common interest outlet for him.

    Of course, I’ve found that groups like the Christian Mothers Guild or Catholic Daughters of America are the same way. Older, retired women. I tried to join the CDA but left after one meeting. I was in my late thirties and I swear the nearest woman my age was in her late fifties. I also couldn’t volunteer to do as much as they could with young kids at the time. A lot of young mothers lack female spaces (at least spaces where bringing kids along isn’t required.)

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  26. AmyP “I think that is a problem with the scouting groups for modern families–that they all require a fairly large commitment and make it harder to do other things.”

    I was surprised when my girls joined as how often I was invited to attend meetings and activities. I resisted because not only did I have a toddler/preschooler at the time but my older two were very clingy to me. I thought it was time they learned to be a little more independent, have to make decisions and socialize without me there to step in and “help” when something was a little challenging. I was shocked at how many of the parents did stay for each meeting. My girls complained a little that there were only a few of them whose parents didn’t stick around. Honestly, I couldn’t see what I was needed for to sit around and do string art and I felt that all the girls sitting with their parents were prevented from helping each other and getting to know one another better.

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  27. Anonymous “The Girl Scouts do have all those activities.”

    You may be right. I’m basing my opinion on my girls’ experience with it in their middle school and early high school years. I was never in Girl Scouts myself. My girls’ got bored with it because it seemed they did A LOT of crafts and baking and a few other minor things but nothing that was very interesting to them or that would give them good life skills in many areas. A lot of it seemed very elementary. It may have just been our particular local leader but even when earning a badge for some craft or other, it seemed she was always dumbing down the requirements in order to earn the badge (“Well, the book says we have to do this to earn the badge. That’s too hard. Let’s just do such and such and I’ll count it as earned.”)

    I figured the reason girls wanted to be in boy scouts was because they got to do more interesting things. If it’s true they can earn badges in many of the same things boys can, then is it really just the gender dysphoria issue that drove the Boy Scouts to make the decision? I may have to look into this further. I haven’t read up on it extensively. Either way, I still think it was a bad move on the Boy Scouts part.

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  28. Anonymous said,

    “Mr. Anon was a Knight also for a while. It is a huge time commitment, to be sure. He dropped out for the time being; said he might go back when the kids are older. I think it’s mostly retirees who make up the majority of the councils here.”

    There are also college councils, but yeah.

    Another thing–notice that there are a lot of complaints about lack of “male spaces” from guys who don’t actually want to go to men’s church groups.

    Like

  29. Mr. Anon was a Knight also for a while. It is a huge time commitment, to be sure. He dropped out for the time being; said he might go back when the kids are older. I think it’s mostly retirees who make up the majority of the councils here.

    Like

  30. Anonymous said:

    “(We did do AHG for less than a year, but we simply had too full a schedule already.)”

    I think that is a problem with the scouting groups for modern families–that they all require a fairly large commitment and make it harder to do other things.

    One of Middle Kid’s chums was inviting Middle Kid to join Boy Scouts (and I think Middle Kid would have enjoyed the activities and we like the other family), but we just can’t make the commitment.

    The contemporary trend is for middle class kids to pursue more specific interests, rather than a group that offers an umbrella for different activities. (Summer camp is like that, too–kids don’t usually just go to “camp,” but to specific interest camps or classes.)

    By the way, I just managed to do a short interview with my husband. Here is a paraphrased version.

    Me: Do you feel like you need more male spaces?

    Husband [puzzled]: What is a male space?

    Me: something something

    Husband [thinking]: I like to have male-only restrooms and male-only change rooms–but I don’t want to TALK to people there.

    Me: Do you feel like you get enough time just with other men just via work and hobbies?

    Husband: Yes

    Husband works in a very male profession, has very male hobbies/athletic interests, and has a lot of male friends from work and hobbies. Also, come to think of it, he and Middle Kid do a lot of athletic activities together. He used to be active in the Knights of Columbus, but we moved and (again) the KofC is a big commitment.

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  31. Two-Cent Woman said:

    “The problem with organic male spaces is that if the group doesn’t have a fundamental purpose to begin with or a purpose that stems from personal anger or bitterness (the manosphere for one), it could lead to trouble where a leader emerges who may not be such a great influence on the group but in the name of camaraderie and lack of anything else that gains their interest, the younger and weaker can be lead into trouble. All males groups for teens and tweens need upstanding men to lead and guide them, which is why YMCA/Boy Scouts are (were?) such great organizations to begin with.”

    Yes.

    Like

  32. 2 Cents:
    The Girl Scouts do have all those activities. This domino stack began tumbling down when the Girl Scouts decided to allow boys in the group if they “identified” as girls. The lunacy called “gender dysphoria”. And the Girl Scouts had plummeted from their pedestal years before for other reasons that we all know pretty much, which is why American Heritage Girls started

    I’m a former Girl Scout, my mother was a Girl Scout and a leader in adult life, my grandmother was a Girl Scout and a leader in adult life. Needless to say, we’re no longer a Girl Scout family. (We did do AHG for less than a year, but we simply had too full a schedule already.)

    Trail Life USA is the Boy Scout alternative, connected to AHG. We’re fortunate that people have done the hard work to get these groups started. Sir Robert Baden-Powell and Juliette Gordon Low are turning in their graves.

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  33. “hence the creation of things like the YMCA and the Boy Scouts as more supervised alternatives. ”

    Yes, but now girls are allowed in Boy Scouts. Personally, I think that is lunacy. If there are girls who want to earn badges by learning some of the skills that the Boy Scouts learn, why in the world didn’t the Girl Scouts just create badges and projects for the girls in those particular skill sets and offer them as an option?

    I don’t think everything has to be co-ed especially for teens or tweens who may at times still feel awkward around those of the opposite sex.

    The problem with organic male spaces is that if the group doesn’t have a fundamental purpose to begin with or a purpose that stems from personal anger or bitterness (the manosphere for one), it could lead to trouble where a leader emerges who may not be such a great influence on the group but in the name of camaraderie and lack of anything else that gains their interest, the younger and weaker can be lead into trouble. All males groups for teens and tweens need upstanding men to lead and guide them, which is why YMCA/Boy Scouts are (were?) such great organizations to begin with.

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  34. TPC mentioned (probably correctly) the existence of all-male social groups starting from puberty.

    I have to mention that there was a lot of anxiety about organic all-male teen and tween social groups, hence the creation of things like the YMCA and the Boy Scouts as more supervised alternatives.

    Here’s Professor Hill warning that there’s trouble in River City:

    They residents of River City don’t seem very enthused by “male spaces.”

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  35. Some Dalrock:

    “Beer commercials are still about being one of the guys, but now they are about a woman becoming one of the guys too. What makes the commercial above noteworthy is that it isn’t noteworthy at all. This is perfectly normal to us. Of course women have more upper body strength than men. And of course a woman can become one of the guys.”

    https://dalrock.wordpress.com/2017/10/16/it-could-be-no-other-way/

    I have to say, this is a funny position to take in a quarter of the internet that believes:

    –women are terrible
    –groups of women are even more terrible

    If both of those things are true, why shouldn’t women flee from the typical feminine lifestyle and the company of other women? It really is not a winning approach to say a) femininity is bad but b) hey, why are you so unfeminine?

    Also, just as a matter of curiosity, I had a look at some video of actual contests to see how women typically do. After all it’s a roughly 5-pound weight, so

    https://www.today.com/food/flex-those-beer-muscles-oktoberfest-stein-holding-competitions-4B11212514

    In the last one, the winner is a young guy named Vlad (surprise), but it wasn’t the case that all of the women dropped out before all of the men. There was a pretty solid showing by several women, even if they didn’t get to the end. (There was one massively cheating woman who stuck in until the end, but I think that was eventually played for humor.)

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  36. You know, to some degree, the basic problem is the college ratchet. It used to be pretty easy to get tradesmen to work for someone with a high income and regular business. But now, they could move in a year or two because the college crowd is highly paid gypsies and then what. So flakiness increases, as does the price of occasional but four to five figure services (they get done by Home Depot or other local big box variants because they have a critical mass of customers, and people use their home equity to deal with the 2x or so markup for escrow and reliable workers who can pass a drug test).

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  37. TPC said:

    ” At a certain point, telling any of them who haven’t had really awesome, easy funtimes on that income that “it’s all regional if anything is ever suboptimal, I guess millions of you should move to my nabe” is well, why I’m a class traitor.”

    Well, it is regional.

    The quality of life for tradespeople is terrible in places like Vancouver, BC–and not coincidentally, the tradespeople are terrible. Those two things go together.

    Our area offers a solid quality of life to tradespeople and we have many good tradespeople. Again, those two things go together.

    (Of course, your legal pot probably doesn’t help at all.)

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  38. There’s millions of married people with kids making 100k+ and hundreds of thousands with stories not wildly dissimilar to mine (sometimes self-chosen, sometimes not). At a certain point, telling any of them who haven’t had really awesome, easy funtimes on that income that “it’s all regional if anything is ever suboptimal, I guess millions of you should move to my nabe” is well, why I’m a class traitor.

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